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They fall asleep on the market carts, in front of the stock market screens, among the animals they raise or on the tracks they build. With a weekly workload of up to 80 hours (despite state law prohibiting formally working more than 49 hours), Chinese workers do not miss an opportunity to recover some sleep.

And all in the name of economic growth that dwarfs Europe and shakes the United States: in the first half of 2013, the Chinese economy grew by 7.7%, a mind-boggling rate yet lower than the historical average of 8 % per year. In the following photos, the protagonists of this "miracle" portrayed while enjoying the few and deserved moments of rest.

In the picture, a salesman dozed off on a load of grapefruits in Wuhan, in the Chinese province of Hubei.

A Formula One race commissioner abandons himself in the arms of Morpheus, while Fernando Alonso shoots a few meters away. We are on the international circuit of Shanghai and this, fortunately, is a test drive.

Do you sleep enough? A test to find out if you are drowsy

A farmer tries to rest among his ducks on a farm near Jiaxing, Zhejiang province. The rural sector is responsible for about a third of China's economic growth, and it is certainly not destined to disappear, at least in the next 30 years.

A Russian investor in front of the stock market screens in Wuhan, in the province of Hubei. It is estimated that in 2040 the Chinese economy will reach 123 trillion dollars, equivalent to almost three times the world economic production of the year 2000.

A woman rests in the middle of plastic bottles at a recycling station in Jiaxing, Zhejiang province.

China catalyses most of the plastic waste coming from Europe, which is then resold on our markets in the form of raw material. The disposal of recyclable waste is entrusted to the immigrants of the poorest provinces, who often find themselves working in semi-illegal dumps, which release toxic waste from the manufacturing processes into the rivers. An immigrant employed in this sector earns on average 800 yuan (80 euros) a month, 4 times the salary of a farmer, for 14-15 hours of work, 30 days a month.

A butcher fell asleep, still holding the knife, on the counter of a Beijing market.

Scented sleep helps to remember

Basket, pillow and duvet: judging by the organization of this cabbage seller photographed in a Suining, Sichuan market, resting at work is a consolidated practice. Many Chinese workers spend the night at the workplace to remedy the problem of long distances.

Sleeping you learn (and survive the crisis)

Did an airport security officer fall asleep in front of a dangerous terrorist? No, the man in the picture is an exhibitor who sells X-ray products, dozing off during a (boring) fair in Beijing.

The first machine that scrutinizes your dreams while you sleep

A worker during a break in a cotton shop in Wuhu, Anhui. By the end of 2013, China should be able to concentrate 47% of the world's reserves of this raw material, also due to the protectionist policies implemented by the government on textile fiber.

Sleep takes the workers of all walks of life by surprise: a delegate from the Chinese people's political advisory conference, the organization representing the various parties of the People's Republic, under the leadership of the Chinese Communist Party, ended up with their eyes closed.

A compilation of yawns: can you watch this video without yawning?

No train should pass: the worker here portrayed fell asleep between the tracks of a station under construction in Wuhan, Hubei.

What happens if we don't get enough sleep?

They rest closely for this man and his poultry. A new strain of avian influenza, that of the H7N9 virus, has raised to 33 the number of deaths from this epidemic in the country. The World Health Organization has made it known that it has taken the threat of a new spread of the virus "very seriously".

You might also like: Test: do you sleep enough? Hong Kong anthill houses People engineers: the best of Chinese do-it-yourself What if we don't get enough sleep? Do you sleep enough? The answer is in your saliva They fall asleep on the market carts, in front of the screens of securities on the stock exchange, among the animals that they raise or on the tracks they build. With a weekly workload of up to 80 hours (despite state law prohibiting formally working more than 49 hours), Chinese workers do not miss an opportunity to recover some sleep.
And all in the name of economic growth that dwarfs Europe and shakes the United States: in the first half of 2013, the Chinese economy grew by 7.7%, a mind-boggling rate yet lower than the historical average of 8 % per year. In the following photos, the protagonists of this "miracle" portrayed while enjoying the few and deserved moments of rest.
In the picture, a salesman dozed off on a load of grapefruits in Wuhan, in the Chinese province of Hubei.