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A subject in the foreground, a self-timer, a dazzling smile (see next photo) and the forest in the background. The perfect pose to post on Facebook except that the protagonist is a rare black crested Sulawesi macaque (Macaca nigra) photographed in total autonomy while becoming familiar with the equipment of an English photographer.

David Slater, 46, was visiting a small national park in the north of Indonesia when he decided to meet the funny primates. After a three-day march following a local guide he came across the creatures, which despite not being accustomed to contact with humans immediately proved to be very friendly. It was enough for the photographer to be absent for a few minutes, abandoning the equipment among the monkeys, that the macaques started to wander around the tripod with the camera, intrigued by their image reflected in the lens.

A particularly enterprising specimen crushed the button to shoot, and intrigued by the noise he repeated the operation hundreds of times. At first the rest of the group got scared, but the fear quickly dissipated, giving way to curiosity. "Before I could recover my camera they had made hundreds of shots, " explained the photographer, who came back in time to enjoy the scene. "At first they took a lot of pictures of teeth, " he said, "although most of the shots came out of focus."

Crested black macaques are at risk of extinction, live concentrated in the forests of the Indonesian island of Sulawesi and spend most of their time on the ground socializing with the other specimens of their group. When the photo started circulating on the net, many suspected it was a fake. But the photographer guarantees that it is all true: "The fact is that they already seem very funny about them, with that tuft of hair a little punk on the head and the reddish eyes, " he said, amused.

The game plays an essential role in brain development and in the social interactions of these primates. Here, a pair of Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) is preparing for a battle of snowballs.

A wipe between the toes is just what it takes to start the day right. And the Japanese macaques are regulars in body care. These Asian monkeys in fact spend a lot of their time soaking in the water, especially in winter when the temperatures are very cold and the only way to stay warm is to wallow in the thermal waters of Jigokudani Park, located in a mountainous area of Central Japan.

It looks just like a popsicle. Instead it is a snowball that a small Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata) seems to enjoy eating. In reality, this species of monkeys feeds mainly on fruit, but in its absence it does not disdain leaves, flowers, insects and barks. His diet is in fact fundamentally regulated by the climate of the area in which he lives, the north of the island of Honsu, an inclement area, covered with snow for 8 months a year.

It seems that a scene is unfolding before the eyes of these cynomolgo macaque cubs (Macaca fascicularis) that it is better not to see. Actually inside the Monkey Forest Park of Ubud Bali (Indonesia), where the two live, everything flows smoothly. In front of the monkeys there is simply a woman on a trip, the Indonesian Anne Young, author of the shot. More likely then that the primates are playing.

From the scorching heat of the savannah to the frost of the mountainous areas in northern Japan. Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) - recognizable by the bright red color of their face - can be found in very different habitats. These are the footprints left on the snow. But is there a human hand? It is only an impression, because just like us these animals have the opposable thumb that allows the taking (and manipulation) of objects.

A black macaque from Sulawesi looks with interest at the photographic lens. The shot was taken by Stefano Unterthiner, one of the most important Italian nature photographers. Go to the gallery with his most beautiful photos

Two macaques engaged in daily grooming activities.

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David Slater, 46, was visiting a small national park in the north of Indonesia when he decided to meet the funny primates. After a three-day march following a local guide he came across the creatures, which despite not being accustomed to contact with humans immediately proved to be very friendly. It was enough for the photographer to be absent for a few minutes, abandoning the equipment among the monkeys, that the macaques started to wander around the tripod with the camera, intrigued by their image reflected in the lens.