Anonim

A dog already appeared in the first film shown in public (it lasted 60 seconds and was called "The exit from the Lumière workshops"). Since then, many dogs and cats have become movie stars. Let's start this tour with Sun Shonik, our biggest four-legged star. Trained by Massimo Perla, he has acted in about 70 films (also with Francis Ford Coppola), fiction ("Il maresciallo Rocca"), and commercials (with Fiorello). But his best performance remains in Mario Monicelli's "Cari fottutissimi amici" (1994). The director said: "The best thing about this film is Shonik and the vintage bus" (the film was set in Italy in 1944). As you can see in the photo, he managed to pee at the same time as Paolo Villaggio and the other cast actors but … looking in the car. Really Oscar!

The first real cat actor in the history of cinema was called Pepper (or "Pepper the Cat") and debuted on the big screen in 1917 in "Are Waitresses Safe". He had a long and successful career alongside such stars as Charlie Chaplin. But it's Orangey, the red cat Tabby, who won the Patsy Award twice, a real Oscar for the actors with legs and tail. In 1952 for his performance in "The cat millionaire", and in 1962 consoling Audy Hepburn in "Breakfast at Tiffany's" (in the photo). It seems that on the set he was a true professional: he held up to eight hours of shooting.

The first real big star with legs and tail (like the Lassie collie of "Torna a casa Lassie!"), Was the German shepherd Rin Tin Tin . A legend not only in film but also in the cathode ray tube. In fact, starting in 1954, "Rinty" debuted on TV with the series "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin", soon becoming a hero of western TV series.

Here is the beautiful hypnotizing Siamese who stole the scene from the diva Kim Novak in the 1958 movie "A Witch in Paradise". It was called Pyewacket and he was also awarded the Patsy Award in 1959.

Asta is considered one of the first canine stars in the history of celluloid comedy. It is the Rough Terrier of the investigating couple Nick (William Powell) and Nora (Myrna Loy), protagonists of the films dedicated to the investigations of the shadow Man. The first feature film of the series "The shadow man" is from 1934.

Among the most famous Siamese in the history of "bestial" cinema is Syn Cat who won the Patsy Award in 1966 for the Disney movie "FBI cat operation". Not only: he also deserved an enthusiastic critique from the "New York Times".

Toto is the Cairn terrier that materializes on the big screen alongside 16-year-old Judy Garland in "The Wizard of Oz" (1939) directed by Victor Fleming. His real name was actually Terry (and he was a female), but after the great success achieved in this last film, fame contributed to changing his generality making it pass into the history of cinema under the name given to him on the screen.

The worst and most disturbing cat in the history of cinema? "The unforgettable Persian Salomon who was caressed by the perfidious Blofeld (the head of the Specter, Ed.) In various episodes of the films starring Agent 007 James Bond" tells the movie historian Giuseppe Colangelo, in the book "Miao, si turns. " He also published "Ciak, si abbaia!" For cinephiles.

Hooch is the burly Dogue de Bordeaux, whose real name is Beasley, which complicates the methodical life and ordered Tom Hanks in "Turner and the casino" (1989). An extremely undisciplined, bungling dog with a bad habit of eating whatever happens to him. Truly the most "chick" dog on the screen, at least until Beethoven arrived …

The unforgettable Beethoven is the puppy of San Bernardo that in the homonymous film directed in 1991 by Brian Levant, is seen to be appropriated by the family that adopted it the name of the great German composer. But the four-legged is little inclined to melodic harmony, rather preferring to combine a lot of trouble. Or even, in the remake "Beethoven 2" (1993), fall madly in love with the bitch Missy to the point of wanting to start a family. And what a family …

Tonto is the red feline protagonist with Art Carney of "Harry e Tonto" (1974), which tells a story very similar to that represented by Vittorio De Sica in "Umberto D." of 1952 (where alongside the protagonist Carlo Battisti there was the dog Flaik, another great hairy star). The performance of the feline Tonto is considered by critics to be one of the best interpretations of "a dramatic actor with a mustache and tail". Not only did Art Carney win the Oscar for best leading actor but also the Tonto cat was awarded the Patsy Award.

In this roundup Sfigatto could not be missing, the Himalayan interpreter alongside Robert De Niro and Ben Stiller of "I introduce you to my parents" (2000) and the sequel "Do you present yours?" (2004).

Continuous reading at newsstands where you find the new Focus Extra is entirely dedicated to them: our pets.

The latest scientific discoveries about our friends and the relationship they have with their master. Dogs, cats, horses, rabbits, birds, fish … But also reptiles. Browse the preview

Some articles that you will find:

► Psychology. Tell me what animal you have and I'll tell you who you are: research shows that the choice of "pet" is not accidental.

► History. Three thousand years of friendship: animal war heroes, astronauts, explorers and companions of famous men.

► Economy. Not only dog ​​sitter, but also ice cream maker, psychologist, wedding companion: these are the new jobs created for "pets".

► Test. What kind of master are you? Test yourself to see if you can better manage your dog or your cat.

You might also like: 100 years of evolution of dogs Can an animal win an Oscar? Vacuum cleaner dogs, picky cats Cinema: how many do you know? A dog already appeared in the first film shown in public (it lasted 60 seconds and was called "The exit from the Lumière workshops"). Since then, many dogs and cats have become movie stars. Let's start this tour with Sun Shonik, our biggest four-legged star. Trained by Massimo Perla, he has acted in about 70 films (also with Francis Ford Coppola), fiction ("Il maresciallo Rocca"), and commercials (with Fiorello). But his best performance remains in Mario Monicelli's "Cari fottutissimi amici" (1994). The director said: "The best thing about this film is Shonik and the vintage bus" (the film was set in Italy in 1944). As you can see in the photo, he managed to pee at the same time as Paolo Villaggio and the other cast actors but … looking in the car. Really Oscar!