Anonim

Some call it the "Paradise Lost": a remote place in the western part of the island of New Guinea, over 300 thousand square hectares of rain forest far from pollution and human presence. It is here, in the heart of the Foja Mountains, that numerous animal species live among undisturbed reptiles, insects, mammals, of which not even the most expert ethologists knew existed. An international expedition organized by Conservation International - a non-profit organization for the protection of biodiversity - in collaboration with the National Geographic Society, managed to photograph some of them. We show you a preview. All the photos of the mission in the June issue of the National Geographic monthly (click here for the online version).

This "Pinocchio" tree frog was perched on a sack of rice in the base camp. When a herpetologist - just the scientist who studies amphibians and reptiles - noticed her remaining astonished: in his entire career he had never seen anything like it.

The long protuberance present on the snout rises when the male emits loud sounds, and collapses when the specimen is less active. The big nose probably belongs to the genus Litoria. All the most beautiful pictures of frogs at this link

Texts: Elisabetta Intini

Photo © Tim Laman / National Geographic (site).

With yellow eyes out of their sockets and a dragon-like expression, this gecko (gen. Cyrtodactylus) is not exactly a splendor. But like all his already-known fellows, he is very adept at climbing on slippery surfaces, cushioning any falls with his tail.

Photos and many other curiosities about geckos

Photo © Tim Laman / National Geographic (site).

A little mouse? An Hamster? No, what you see, even if you don't think so, is a relative of the kangaroo, as well as the smallest marsupial ever observed in freedom: a dwarf wallaby. In addition to the little one of the genus Dorcopsulus, the researchers were also able to photograph for the first time a very rare arboreal kangaroo with a golden mantle (Dendrolagus pulcherrimus) whose survival is seriously threatened due to poaching.

Photo © Tim Laman / National Geographic (site).

This one is a mouse, and how! Or rather, a giant and ultra-powerful rat (gen. Mallomys) that we would hope to never cross on our way. Although the expedition took place in the last part of 2008, the photos and results have only been published: 2010 has been declared by the United Nations as the International Year of Biodiversity.

Photo © Tim Laman / National Geographic (site).

During the expedition he was noticed four times, while observing the researchers with a "haughty" air. Compared to the birds to which we are accustomed this imperial colombo (gen. Ducula) never observed before, has rather unusual colors: blue, greyish and rust. More spectacular bird photos (watch)

Photo © Tim Laman / National Geographic (site).

Glucose blood sugar for this little bat of the genus Syconycteris, which feeds on the nectar of rainforest flowers. If he were greedy even for insects he would always have a full stomach: only in this expedition were at least 12 new species discovered.

Don't miss the photo gallery dedicated to bats

Photo © Tim Laman / National Geographic (site).

An aerial view of the Foja Rainforest. The remarkable isolation, the altitude (the expedition has gone up to 2200 meters of altitude) and the tropical climate would have contributed to make this region a sort of "happy island" as far as species richness is concerned. Scientists hope that these new discoveries will push the Indonesian government that administers the region to strengthen biodiversity protection policies.

Photo © Tim Laman / National Geographic (site).

You might also like: The new species of 2013 The top ten of new mammals discovered in the last 10 years Cowboy frogs and armored catfish Who's new? The most interesting species of 2011 The Biodiversity Carnival is coming Some people call it the "Paradise Lost": a remote place in the western part of the island of New Guinea, over 300 thousand square hectares of rainforest far from pollution and human presence . It is here, in the heart of the Foja Mountains, that numerous animal species live among undisturbed reptiles, insects, mammals, of which not even the most expert ethologists knew existed. An international expedition organized by Conservation International - a non-profit organization for the protection of biodiversity - in collaboration with the National Geographic Society, managed to photograph some of them. We show you a preview. All the photos of the mission in the June issue of the National Geographic monthly (click here for the online version).
This "Pinocchio" tree frog was perched on a sack of rice in the base camp. When a herpetologist - just the scientist who studies amphibians and reptiles - noticed her remaining astonished: in his entire career he had never seen anything like it.
The long protuberance present on the snout rises when the male emits loud sounds, and collapses when the specimen is less active. The big nose probably belongs to the genus Litoria. All the most beautiful pictures of frogs at this link
Texts: Elisabetta Intini
Photo © Tim Laman / National Geographic (site).