Anonim

It is enough for him to shake the "blond" ridge, to have all the females at his feet.

When it comes to seduction, the crested eudipte (Eudyptes chrysocome) is a true master and when it sways the long tufts of yellow feathers that accompany the muzzle, it certainly does not go unnoticed. But it is not a Don Giovanni: in spite of the heartbreaker air this penguin of the Atlantic is a faithful type and every year during the mating period - in the first days of spring or in summer - it goes in search of the same partner of the previous seasons.

Discover many other penguin curiosities
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He lives in the Edinburgh Zoo, Scotland, along with other animals, but this is an unusual penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus). And of "regal", besides the name and the decisive walk with which he passes in front of the military, he also has the title: he is colonel in chief of the Norwegian Royal Guard!

It was 1972 when a lieutenant of this military body proposed to adopt a penguin as a mascot. The chosen bird was renamed Nils Olav in honor of King Olav V of Norway. But unfortunately he didn't make a great career, when he died he was only a sergeant. His place then was taken by Nils Olav II (pictured), also recently appointed knight.

The cosmic bad luck of the emperor penguin (look)
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A young penguin for the first time? Not at all, what you see is an adult and vaccinated example of a minor penguin (Eudyptula minor). Named for its short stature, 40 centimeters (about half of a common penguin and a third of the emperor penguin 1, 20 meters high). A month ago the little guy was found more dead than alive on an Australian beach. But now, after a period of treatment in a Sydney zoo, he can finally take off for the southern coast, where the penguins live. And it is better that he hurry because probably his partner is anxiously waiting. If in fact these penguins - generally monogamous - make long solitary swims in search of food during the day, they return to "home" as soon as darkness falls. In the arms, or rather between the wings, of the partner.

Discover many other penguin curiosities
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These birds in tails have a lot of established habits. Year after year, when emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri) return from migration to the north, where they stay for two months, they always choose the same piece of ice that floats in the Antarctic sea. So, season after season, they always choose the same partner to reproduce, if he survived adversity.

Biologists are also intrigued by the fact that this is the only penguin to prefer the coldest season for loves. In the middle of winter it is then the male that takes care of the incubation of the egg . In the photo, an adult surrounded by a group of newborns who keep each other warm …

This penguin has fun surfing in the waters of the Malvinas Islands (or the Falkland Islands as the British call them), in Argentina. But it is not his only sporting specialty, the Papua penguin of the species Pygoscelis papua is also a skilled swimmer, probably the fastest among the birds. Like all penguins, use wings not to fly but to swim and dive for fish and squid.
There are about 17 different species of penguins, even very different in size. The emperor penguin - that of the film "March of the Penguins" for instance - is the largest and can even reach a height of 1.20 meters. While those belonging to the smallest species sometimes do not exceed 50 centimeters.
Find out all about penguins .

The colony that lives in the South Sandwich Islands in the Antarctic has over 10 million specimens, gathered in about 7.5 million pairs. We speak of the Antarctic penguins ( Antarctic Pygoscelis), which in this photo are grouped on an iceberg in the Weddel Sea.
Unlike the emperor penguins, which we have told you about the difficult procreation struggle, this species does not jump through hoops. The hatching of laid eggs (generally two) occurs on circular nests with a diameter of about 40 centimeters, built with small stones and raised from the ground by about fifteen centimeters.
Both parents hatch, changing every 5-10 days: after 33-35 days the chicks are born and remain in the nest for almost a month. Later they reach the kindergarten where all the little ones gather to save themselves from the great cold.

Four Papua penguins (Pygoscelis papua) seem to dance, with almost perfect coordination, in front of the goal of an American researcher in Antarctica. Unlike most birds, penguins migrate on foot. They are so-called gregarious animals: they tend to live in groups and the most numerous colonies can reach 50 thousand units. Sometimes they can give the impression of moving in synchrony, especially when they walk in single file. They do it to shelter from the wind.

Why do their legs, exposed to very cold temperatures (below -80 ° C) and resting for a long time on ice, do not freeze? Find out among the questions and answers.

Photo: © Tom Schonhoff.

Now he has recovered. But when he was found on a beach near Sydney, Australia, this big-billed penguin (Eudyptes pachyrhynchus) was really exhausted. And how not to understand it: starting from New Zealand, it traveled 2, 000 km by swim. An excellent swimmer but not only, according to new research conducted in the United States (in Arizona) penguins also have a good sense of smell. Researchers from the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology have placed a sample of dimethyl sulphide, a chemical with a particularly unpleasant smell, in the center of a labyrinth, discovering that penguins are perfectly capable of locating it.

Scent of food? Maybe! The odorous substance is, in fact, produced by plankton, the basic nourishment of the penguins.

"I knew it, I didn't have to go overboard with the crustaceans" this penguin (fam Spheniscidae) will be thinking about struggling with the scale. The little guest of a zoo in Hanover (in Germany) will probably feel a little "swollen". But his extra kilos would surely envy many of his fellow nature dwellers. Like for example the males of emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri), who during the hatching of the eggs can remain fasting for more than two months waiting for the partner, left in search of food, to return to the nest. In this period the future fathers lose much of their weight, which according to the reproductive period oscillates between 22 and 37 kilos.

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The penguins of Adélie (Pygoscelis adeliae) - from the name of the wife who died prematurely of the French explorer Jules Dumont d'Urville (1790-1842) - have an archenemy: leopard seals (Hydrurga leptonyx). To defend themselves from this predator that is waiting for them in the cold waters of the Antarctic, the penguins choose a group strategy: that is, they dive simultaneously so as to reduce the possibility of an individual ending up captured. The Adélie penguins are also precious babysitters: in addition to looking after their own nest, in fact, they take care of the defense of the nests of other couples and of the entire colony if necessary.

For the Adelie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) snow is nothing new: they live in Antarctica, where even in summer (the "hottest" month is December) the temperature rarely exceeds -20 ° C. The winter collapse of temperatures coincides with the descent of the Sun over the horizon towards April. The record was reached in Amundsen-Scott with -82.8 ° C (23 June 1982) and in Vostok with -89.2 ° C (21 July 1983); the latter is the lowest temperature ever recorded.

However, this species of penguins prefers to nest in coastal areas that are not frozen in summer: they gather in colonies of about 200 thousand pairs, in which the females lay 2 eggs at a distance of about 2 days from each other.

In the picture, the rites of courtship begin

Antarctic penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) are born and live in fairly large colonies: each of them is about 70 centimeters high and its weight is between 3.5 and 5 kilograms. For these penguins, the leopard seals are the most incipient danger: the small ones and the eggs instead are threatened by the Antarctic chioni (Chionis alba) and by the skua, or Antarctic skua (Stercorarius sp.).

These penguins are still considered among the most "quarrelsome" and very often collide with other penguins. Scholars often recognize them and call them "stonebreaker penguins" because of the high tone of their calls.

In search of a moment of notoriety this sea elephant (Gen. Mirounga) has not missed the opportunity to spoil the holidays to a photographer who was trying to immortalize a group of penguins in the Bay of Saint Andrews in South Georgia, near the Islands Falklands. The beast has popped several times from behind a dune intruding on the shot and then disappearing into the water and reappearing with an amused air. And his quest for fame eventually got the better: the penguins in this photo, I'm certainly not the protagonists. Southern sea elephants (Mirounga leonina) spend 90% of their life in the oceans, with long dives in search of food ranging from half an hour to two hours in duration. Most of the "dives" reach depths of 300-800 meters, but dives of 1500 meters have also been observed, an exceeded depth, in mammals, only from sperm whales. Despite being excellent swimmers, however, they know how to move quickly even on land.

More photos and curiosities about sea elephants (watch)

To do justice also to the penguins, a gallery dedicated to them

It will also be cold outside, but these two penguins holding hands … indeed, for the wing among the Antarctic ice they would also warm the icy heart. While the professional photographer Silviu Ghetie, from Romania, took photos of the surreal landscape of Port Lockroy, a natural inlet in the Antarctic Peninsula, a couple of penguins entered the target field and immediately turned to the reporter's attention. The two remained aloof from the rest of the group, in a romantic attitude, for a couple of minutes, before being interrupted by a "third wheel".

Don't miss the gallery dedicated to penguins

More spectacular photos of animals in love

You might also like: Why do penguin paws not freeze? Wing in the wing Find the intruder Face to face with a leopard seal Penguins (losers) you are born … or do you become? It is enough for him to shake the "blond" ridge, to have all the females at his feet.
When it comes to seduction, the crested eudipte (Eudyptes chrysocome) is a true master and when it sways the long tufts of yellow feathers that accompany the muzzle, it certainly does not go unnoticed. But it is not a Don Giovanni: in spite of the heartbreaker air this penguin of the Atlantic is a faithful type and every year during the mating period - in the first days of spring or in summer - it goes in search of the same partner of the previous seasons.
Discover many other penguin curiosities
[EI]