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It's spring and for the bees it's time to get to work: what could be better than a dip in the pollen?

This is one of the spectacular photographs of Frans Vandemaele, a retired Belgian engineer, who dedicates his free time to photography: super detailed close-ups of the insects that inhabit (or frequent) his garden. And that for this passion has even developed a special photographic technique and built all the equipment he needs (see the last photo of this gallery).

The foreground of another pollinator insect with its legs still smeared …

Not all insects come out into the open with sunlight. In order not to lose sight of even the most "nocturnal" animals, Vandemaele has provided, in its device, also a system of LEDs, specialized in portraying moths (in the photo) and other nocturnal moths. The engineer, who has been dedicated to this activity since 2004, also invented a "stage name": Fotoopa, a cross between fotograaf ("photographer") and opa, which in Dutch means "grandfather".
More photos and curiosity about moths

A diptera "occhialuto" (fam. Syrphidae). Vandemaele's new project is three-dimensional photography: "I designed a device that uses two chambers and mirrors to obtain three-dimensional photos, " said Vandemaele. The spectacular results are online on Flickr and on the PBase.com site. The film Avatar was to inspire the Belgian engineer for this new challenge.

In addition to flying creatures of all kinds - in the photo a dragonfly (Ischnura elegans) - Vandemaele also photographs moving colored liquids. Whatever the subject, thanks to the particular photographic technique his shots are snapped up. But the engineer does not seem willing to make it a business: «Selling is not my priority, this is just a hobby for me. Once I've earned enough to finance my equipment, that's enough for me. "

Do you like these photographs? See also the gallery The most crazy insects on the planet!

Photographing an insect's flight with a common digital camera is a difficult undertaking, if not impossible. The time to aim the lens and the little animal with a quick blow of wings, has already disappeared. Vandemaele, thanks to 15 years of experience as a mechanical engineer, has found a solution: the 4 lasers - two infrared and two green - present in his device indicate to the camera the exact moment in which to shoot. Being able to portray insects with just 6 milliseconds of delay (most cameras use at least a 50th, if not a 100th, of a second).

This ladybug resting on an early morning flower seems to be inlaid with the finest pearls. The transparent "mantle" on its back is formed by dewdrops, immortalized by a German photographer who used macro lenses. The colorful livery of the seven-point ladybugs (fam. Coccinellidae) is a clear warning sign for potential predators: the tasting may be unpleasant. If touched or scared, in fact, these beetles emit a yellow liquid with a pungent odor that serves to discourage the aggressor from continuing with the attack. This toxic substance is poisonous to many types of birds, which fall back on another bite.

Don't miss the gallery dedicated to the strangest insects in the world

Garden bugs, in the foreground

More photos of ladybugs (watch)

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This is one of the spectacular photographs of Frans Vandemaele, a retired Belgian engineer, who dedicates his free time to photography: super detailed close-ups of the insects that inhabit (or frequent) his garden. And that for this passion has even developed a special photographic technique and built all the equipment he needs (see the last photo of this gallery).