Anonim

Koala. The animal known for its activity of "hug" of trees generally tends to avoid aggressive behavior, which it considers a real waste of energy. The slow metabolism of the marsupial causes the animal to spend 22 hours a day sleeping and eating small snacks, and spend just 15 minutes on social interactions. However, even this mammal occasionally "unravels": aggressive behaviors manifest themselves between rival males, in the form of data bites behind them and similar meetings to wrestling matches, but also - albeit rarely - towards man. In December 2014, the Australian Mary Anne Forster had to endure a long ankle bite from a koala, for trying to defend her dogs from the aggression of the marsupial. The animal sank his teeth into the heel and did not let go until the woman opened her jaws by hand, repairing a 12-point wound.

beaver. The most precise architect-engineer of the animal kingdom is strongly territorial, and protects the carefully constructed dams with sharp teeth that never cease to grow. The incautious beavers of foreign colonies who try to enter the rival territories, or the human beings who have found themselves involuntarily invading the areas occupied by rodents, know this well. However, before arriving at bad manners, these animals leave warnings: first they mark the territory with odorous signals, then they produce a very well audible sound by hitting the flat tail against the surface of the water. Who has ears to hear …

swan. The relationship between man and swans seems to be a relationship of mute admiration. At least until you approach - even accidentally, during a canoe trip along a river - to the nest of these birds. The male specimens are extremely territorial and defend the brood with wing and beak strokes, helped by the intimidating tonnage (up to 2.4 m wingspan). Hannibal, a swan from Pembroke Castle, Wales, killed at least 15 of his fellows and then showed the grim trophy to his partner, looking satisfied. And then there is the story of Mr Asbo, the antisocial swan that was removed from a river in Cambridge because it terrorized the canoeists who ventured in its vicinity, coming to overturn the boats.

loris slow. Few animals can boast a poisonous elbow: the loris lento (gen. Nycticebus) a small primate originating from Indonesia, famous for its cartoon eyes, is among them. When he feels threatened the mammal raises his arms in a defensive position that is anything but harmless. In the hollow of his elbows glands hide that secrete a substance that makes contact with saliva poisonous. The bite of the loris therefore becomes poisoned, and to make matters worse the animal begins to blow with a hiss similar to that of a cobra. The amount of poison ko only small animals, but it is sufficient to cause an anaphylactic shock in humans.

cow. Hard to imagine a threatening cow. Yet there is a breed of cattle, the Heck breed, which is known for its particular aggressiveness: these cows were selected in the 1920s and 30s by two German breeders, the Heinz brothers and Lutz Heck, starting with the Toro de lidia Spanish, a particularly primitive and aggressive bovine breed. The idea, supported by the Nazis, was to revive the uro, a large extinct bovine, whose killing was considered an act of courage. In 2009, the English breeder Derek Gow tried to keep some of these cattle on his farm: he had to give up because "they were trying to kill anyone, " he explained.

dolphin. The good reputation of Flipper and the smile that nature has perpetually printed on the jaws of dolphins often make us forget that it is still a wild animal. Perhaps this is why the episodes of aggression between dolphins are so difficult to "digest". The largest specimens can indulge in aggressive behavior towards the other specimens of the group, and episodes of infanticide have been documented (not linked to cannibalism and therefore independent of food cravings). Bites, traps and attempts to drag underwater have also been observed against man, probably in response to the intrusive attitude we have towards these animals, treated as playground attractions, even within their own natural habitat.

hippopotamus. On the latter we had some more suspicion (unless you still believe the soft and funny hippo of an old advertisement). The dominant males are extremely territorial and few scruples are made to kill the young rivals who try to contend for their scepter. In Africa, these beasts charge and attack every threat - even on two feet - that they approach their territory, and kill more men than sharks and lions. In spite of what one thinks, they are not at all slow: on earth they can reach 48 km per hour of speed, and they move even faster in the water.

Stay away from them too! More unsuspecting killers with their incredible stories can be found in Focus number 269 on newsstands until March 19, 2015 and digitally forever on different platforms: iOS - Android - Amazon - Zinio (web).

You might also like: Animal historical lies Animal weirdness, how much do you know? Do hyenas deserve their bad name? Australia: the country of the 7 fearsome creatures Wild life: the breathtaking battles between prey and koala predators. The animal known for its activity of "hug" of trees generally tends to avoid aggressive behavior, which it considers a real waste of energy. The slow metabolism of the marsupial causes the animal to spend 22 hours a day sleeping and eating small snacks, and spend just 15 minutes on social interactions. However, even this mammal occasionally "unravels": aggressive behaviors manifest themselves between rival males, in the form of data bites behind them and similar meetings to wrestling matches, but also - albeit rarely - towards man. In December 2014, the Australian Mary Anne Forster had to endure a long ankle bite from a koala, for trying to defend her dogs from the aggression of the marsupial. The animal sank his teeth into the heel and did not let go until the woman opened her jaws by hand, repairing a 12-point wound.