Anonim

Yellow scorpion. In the 8-11 cm of this endemic creature of the deserts of Africa and the Middle East is concentrated a powerful cocktail of neurotoxins, capable of causing anaphylactic shock and pulmonary edema, as well as a series of acute pains in the tip area. Fortunately the dose of poison administered by this nocturnal scorpion, from the scientific name of Leiurus quinquestriatus, is only rarely lethal: the cases of death are for now limited to children or physically debilitated subjects.

Golden frog or arrow frog. With the previous animal "killer" it shares the bright color, which is often a sign of high toxicity. In fact the skin of this amphibian of Central and South America (Phyllobates terribilis), on average 4.5 cm long, is covered with a neurotoxic alkaloid, batrachotoxin, also used by some indigenous populations to prepare deadly arrows. It appears that the toxicity of the poison is linked to the consumption of particular ants ingested by frogs in freedom. If they are fed with other food, they often lose their toxicity. Other curiosities on the poison and the 7 species of minirane discovered in Brazil

Moscow tze-tze. This widespread insect in the African continent, and about twice the size of a common fly, is notorious for transmitting African trypanosomiasis, a serious infection that involves weakening and swelling of the glands, up to encephalitis and coma, also known as sleeping sickness. For the advanced forms of this infection there is no specific therapy to date. In the photo, a specimen of fly tze tze ready to lay eggs.

Blue-ringed octopus. Despite their small size (the largest reach 5 cm in body length, plus 10 cm of tentacles), octopuses with blue rings (gen. Hapalochlaena), characteristic of tropical peaceful waters, are among the most lethal creatures in the world. A single tetrodoxin-based bite (the same neurotoxin as puffers, more poisonous than cyanide) can kill an adult in 90 minutes. 10 interesting facts about octopuses

Flea. When it comes to transmitting diseases, few animals are devious like fleas. These parasites that feed on animal blood, in particular that of rodents, are among the main vectors of diseases such as bubonic plague and murine typhus. They are about 2 mm long and generally go unnoticed: even today the WHO records from 1000 to 3000 cases of bubonic plague annually.

Indian red scorpion. Just 5-9 cm long, the Hottentotta tumulus, found in India, Pakistan and Nepal, is considered the most dangerous scorpion in the world. Its venom affects the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, and kills in 8-40% of cases. Most of its victims are children (because their body is smaller and easily accessible to toxins): fortunately, it only attacks when it feels really in danger.

Medusa Irukandji. This jelly-like creature that swims in Australian waters has a body no larger than 1 cubic cm, but with long tentacles (up to 1 m in length) full of nematocysts, as well as the umbrella. Despite the fragility of their body, which flakes against the simple wall of an aquarium, a single sting of these jellyfish is sufficient to transmit the "Irukandji syndrome" that causes muscle cramps, migraine, tachycardia, insomnia, and that in some cases it turned out to be lethal (although generally a single sting is not enough to kill a man). Here we see her intent on catching a fish.

Take part in our jellyfish census; spectacular photos of jellyfish

Mosquito. As we know, mosquitoes are by far the most lethal animal to humans. Faults of which these insects become vectors: malaria, Dengue fever, yellow fever and various forms of encephalitis, just to name a few infections. There are 725, 000 human deaths caused each year by mosquitoes. Find out why mosquitoes really bite you and 10 things you may not know about these blood-suckers

You might also like: Russell's Viper, the world's deadliest snake Are there poisonous birds? Mushrooms, beautiful (and good) to die Spiders in bananas: danger or hoax? Yellow scorpion. In the 8-11 cm of this endemic creature of the deserts of Africa and the Middle East is concentrated a powerful cocktail of neurotoxins, capable of causing anaphylactic shock and pulmonary edema, as well as a series of acute pains in the tip area. Fortunately the dose of poison administered by this nocturnal scorpion, from the scientific name of Leiurus quinquestriatus, is only rarely lethal: the cases of death are for now limited to children or physically debilitated subjects.