Anonim

In a period in which the dangers for the animal world abound, but the funds for the protection of endangered species are scarce, technology can lend a hand to those who work for the conservation of fauna.

"Camera traps", low-cost cameras that are activated automatically when a trigger is pressed, also immortalize the rarest or most timid species in their natural habitat, documenting their habits, their spread, and day and night. distribution. And saving biologists long and wasteful months of field research.
The BBC Wildlife Camera-Trap Photo of the Year competition, now in its fourth edition, rewards the best "stolen" shots from hidden cameras and finances projects to protect and conserve the species most at risk.
This shot of a rare mouse-tailed dormouse (Myomimus roachi) photographed in Turkey and classified as "vulnerable" in the IUCN red list won the absolute first prize ($ 4900, about 3550 euros) beating the other 850 photos entered, as well as the victory in the "New Discoveries" category.

The first ever captured image of a giant armadillo puppy (Priodontes maximus) with one of the parents reached the final in the category dedicated to new discoveries.

That beast of my son: the most tender family pictures of the animal world

Some wolf cubs sheltered in a den in the mountains of Turkey. Second classified in the "New discoveries" category.

The man who has lived with wolves for 40 years

Can you distinguish the howling of a dog from that of a wolf?

This photo of Misha, one of the 35 tigers of Amur (Panthera tigris altaica) of the natural reserve of Lazovskii (south-eastern Russia) for years monitored by the Zoological Society of London, was awarded the first prize in the section "Animal portraits".

Photographers who study these felines for years manage to identify each specimen from the combination of lines in its mantle. The one portrayed here is a male who has conquered this slice of territory after the death of the previous male alpha.

Two tigers play in the snow: the video

The most beautiful photos of animals in the snow

These Sierra Leone chimpanzees seem to have noticed that someone, or rather something, is watching them. And they almost wink at the lens.

These primates are crazy! The most irreverent photos of monkeys

And a succession of animal smiles

It is not a small kangaroo but a giant brown galagon (Otolemur crassicaudatus) a "jumping" primate with nocturnal habits widespread in sub-Saharan Africa.

A snow leopard (Panthera uncia) marks the territory by scattering fragrant traces among the rocks, under the breathtaking starry night of a Tibetan night. First classified in the "Animal Behavior" category.

This could be the last photo that portrays an Indian sambar deer (Rusa unicolor) finished in the sights of a tiger. Second classified in the category "Animal behavior".

Wild life: the breathtaking battles between prey and predators

A ferret badger (gen. Melogale) returns home with a "take-away" dinner: a newly captured snake. Finalist in the "Animal Behavior" category.

Snakes for all (dis) tastes

The eyes of a Tasmanian devil, a small marsupial that - due to the disturbing scream it emits at night - enjoys a sinister reputation. Shooting is one of the most popular photos in the "Animal Portraits" category.

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"Camera traps", low-cost cameras that are activated automatically when a trigger is pressed, also immortalize the rarest or most timid species in their natural habitat, documenting their habits, their spread, and day and night. distribution. And saving biologists long and wasteful months of field research.
The BBC Wildlife Camera-Trap Photo of the Year competition, now in its fourth edition, rewards the best "stolen" shots from hidden cameras and finances projects to protect and conserve the species most at risk.
This shot of a rare mouse-tailed dormouse (Myomimus roachi) photographed in Turkey and classified as "vulnerable" in the IUCN red list won the absolute first prize ($ 4900, about 3550 euros) beating the other 850 photos entered, as well as the victory in the "New Discoveries" category.