Anonim

The Collembola are a class of arthropods of millimeter size that inhabit all terrestrial environments with a little humidity. They are tiny little animals, mostly omnivorous, that contribute to the degradation of organic matter. They move slowly, but can jump using a sort of organic spring placed under the abdomen.
The author of these shots, Andy Murray, is a macro photographer and science writer: his site is a treasure trove of photographic treasures and information on the tiny fauna of the soil.
In the picture: a Pseudachorutes sp. while it feeds on the fruiting body of a fungus or a myxomycete.

A Katianna sp., found in Montagu, Tasmania.

Sminthurides sp. : a young male and a female on the bank of a river in Cape Tribulation, New Zealand.

Acanthanura sp. : a giant Tasmanian hillock, 11 millimeters long.

Megalanura tasmaniae: a species of the island of Tasmania.

A species of the genus Bilobella or Vitronura, of the subfamily Neanurinae, from the tropical wetlands of Australia.

Spinotheca sp: small New Zealand collagmene.

Holacanthella sp.

A bright blue species of the genus Neelides, about 0.8 mm long.

Fasciosminthurus quinquefasciatus, discovered in Canada: it is probably an exotic species, because it is very tolerant to heat.

Pygmarrhopolites pygmaeus: very common in caves and in dark places.

Sminthurides aquaticus: a common aquatic spring-block, photographed in England.

Lepidocyrtus sp. : photographed on a spider web.

Holacanthella paucispinosa: a giant species.

I. plumosus and juveniles of S. aquaticus, found near a pond.

Temeritas sp. : a species of wet tropical areas photographed in Australia.

Dicyrtomina sp.

Pseudachorutes sp.

Allacma fusca: a very common species, large (about 3.5 mm), typical of the northern hemisphere.

You might also like: The lethal tail of the sea scorpion 8 mini monsters The man and the face mites: friends forever Why are tarantulas blue? From seed to flower: time-lapse video The Collembola are a class of arthropods of millimeter size that inhabit all terrestrial environments with a little humidity. They are tiny little animals, mostly omnivorous, that contribute to the degradation of organic matter. They move slowly, but can jump using a sort of organic spring placed under the abdomen.
The author of these shots, Andy Murray, is a macro photographer and science writer: his site is a treasure trove of photographic treasures and information on the tiny fauna of the soil.
In the picture: a Pseudachorutes sp. while it feeds on the fruiting body of a fungus or a myxomycete.