Anonim

Hunting foxes is good for nature
The lands in which the lords hunt foxes are richer in woods. An excuse to kill small predators?

A fox in the English countryside. According to some studies, fox hunting is good for the environment, because the owners safeguard the woods.
A fox in the English countryside. According to some studies, fox hunting is good for the environment, because the owners safeguard the woods.

It seems that keeping a hunting ground helps to safeguard forests and hedges, especially in England. The controversial investigation, developed by researchers at the University of Kent's Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology, has yielded interesting results. Many privately owned land is used as a hunting ground for foxes or partridges. Others, always private, are instead used only as agricultural land. For reasons that have strictly to do with hunting, the lands used for killing animals are richer in woods and hedges, and their owners take greater advantage of the subsidies that the government grants to those who preserve biodiversity. For this they use the funds to replant trees and hedges, thus increasing the territory for all animal species. The owners who allow fox and partridge hunting on their land thus have about 7 per cent of their property's forested land, compared to less than 1 per cent of non-hunter owners. It also seems that fox hunting is an incentive to plant other hedges, one of the richest environments for animal and plant species and most important for England's biodiversity.

(News updated June 1, 2003)