Anonim

There is traffic … and the great tits raise their voices
Some specimens of kills are able to modify the timbre and frequency of their song to adapt to the chaos of the metropolis. Those who do not are destined to disappear from our cities.

Image
A great tit in its natural habitat.
In the city, life is much more complicated because of it
of noise pollution.

Sometimes the traffic noise is really unbearable. We realize this when we struggle to hear what our interlocutor says on the phone, and we ourselves, to make ourselves understood, have to raise our voices. But, given the progressive and continuous expansion of urban areas, even the animals that populate the big cities have had to adapt.
The voice is getting higher and higher
From a study conducted by Hans Slabbekoorn of Leiden University, reported by Nature, it appears that the city tits (Parus major) have modified the timbre and the frequency of their song: compared to their country "cousins", in fact, they emit very loud sounds more acute and closer together. This would allow them to be heard more clearly in the midst of the metropolitan chaos; furthermore, the males of this species have had to adapt to this new standard so as not to be cut off from the ritual of conquest and mating.
One in a thousand species can do it
As Slabbekoorn explains, the most severe sounds are best suited to be perceived through the foliage of extra-urban vegetation, while the more acute and bright ones are more easily distinguished in the midst of traffic noise.
This study highlights a rather important zoological problem: while the growth of metropolitan areas continues, some birds have not developed this ability to adapt. In fact, there are different breeds that develop a specific sound frequency from the first few months, which they can no longer modify. The real risk is that these species disappear from the urban environment, which had become, already with difficulty, their natural habitat.
(News updated December 5, 2006)