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Blackbird (Turdus merula)

It is part of the group of worm-eaters. Start singing at 4am and you can listen to it until about 6.30am.

It has very large eyes, compared to the size of the body, more suitable to see in the dark and to find the worms that, at dawn, rise towards the surface of the ground.

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Song Thrush (Turdus philomelos)

It is part of the group of worm-eaters. Start singing at 4am and you can listen to it until about 6.30am.

It has very large eyes, compared to the size of the body, more suitable to see in the dark and to find the worms that, at dawn, rise towards the surface of the ground.

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Robin (Erithacus rubecula)

It is part of the group of worm-eaters. Start singing at 4am and you can listen to it until about 6.30am.

It has very large eyes, compared to the size of the body, more suitable to see in the dark and to find the worms that, at dawn, rise towards the surface of the ground.

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Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes)

It is part of the group of insect eaters that begin to sing from 5 to 5.30. With eyes larger than seed eaters, wrens are more sensitive to the light of dawn and thus manage to find flying insects and spiders for breakfast.

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Luì piccolo (Phylloscopus collybita)

It is part of the group of insect eaters that start singing from 5 to 5.30. With eyes larger than seed eaters, the small ones are more sensitive to the light of dawn and thus manage to find flying insects and spiders for breakfast.

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Blackcap (Sylvia atricapilla)

It is part of the group of insect eaters that start singing from 5 to 5.30. With eyes larger than seed eaters, blackcaps are more sensitive to the light of dawn and thus manage to find flying insects and spiders for breakfast.

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Chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs)

It is part of the group of seed eaters that start singing later, around 6am. They have smaller eyes and need more light to find their food, especially when great precision is needed to extract smaller seeds from the ground .

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Goldfinch (Carduelis carduelis)

It is part of the group of seed eaters that start singing later, around 6am. They have smaller eyes and need more light to find their food, especially when great precision is needed to extract smaller seeds from the ground .

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Sparrow (Passer domesticus)

It is part of the group of seed eaters that start singing later, around 6am. They have smaller eyes and need more light to find their food, especially when great precision is needed to extract smaller seeds from the ground . In the photo, a matting sparrow.

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It is part of the group of worm-eaters. Start singing at 4am and you can listen to it until about 6.30am.
It has very large eyes, compared to the size of the body, more suitable to see in the dark and to find the worms that, at dawn, rise towards the surface of the ground.
Your browser does not support the audio element.