Anonim

Yes, but almost always the substances they take have other functions (mostly purifying) and the buzz is only a "side effect". Cats, for example, are crazy about catnip: the nepetalactone it contains is similar to sexual pheromones and therefore excites them, but it also has an antimicrobial action. Similarly, the jaguars of the Amazon eat the bark of a wild vine that contains a hallucinogenic agent, but they do so because the same molecule also has a purgative and pesticide effect. The lemurs of Madagascar instead eat some centipedes that secrete a narcotic, antiparasitic.

They find it but they don't use it! Drugs against drugs, trained to find it, are not drugged: they simply use their sense of smell to locate it. The training consists in getting them used to following the smell of drugs and finding them in exchange for a harmless prize, such as food, cuddles or attention.

Chronic drinkers.

Ptilocercus lowii

Drunk and annoying.

Sclerocarya birrea

buganu

Yes, but almost always the substances they take have other functions (mostly purifying) and the buzz is only a "side effect". Cats, for example, are crazy about catnip: the nepetalactone it contains is similar to sexual pheromones and therefore excites them, but it also has an antimicrobial action. Similarly, the jaguars of the Amazon eat the bark of a wild vine that contains a hallucinogenic agent, but they do so because the same molecule also has a purgative and pesticide effect. The lemurs of Madagascar instead eat some centipedes that secrete a narcotic, antiparasitic.

They find it but they don't use it! Drugs against drugs, trained to find it, are not drugged: they simply use their sense of smell to locate it. The training consists in getting them used to following the smell of drugs and finding them in exchange for a harmless prize, such as food, cuddles or attention.

Chronic drinkers.

Ptilocercus lowii

Drunk and annoying.

Sclerocarya birrea

buganu

Yes, but almost always the substances they take have other functions (mostly purifying) and the buzz is only a "side effect". Cats, for example, are crazy about catnip: the nepetalactone it contains is similar to sexual pheromones and therefore excites them, but it also has an antimicrobial action. Similarly, the jaguars of the Amazon eat the bark of a wild vine that contains a hallucinogenic agent, but they do so because the same molecule also has a purgative and pesticide effect. The lemurs of Madagascar instead eat some centipedes that secrete a narcotic, antiparasitic.

They find it but they don't use it! Drugs against drugs, trained to find it, are not drugged: they simply use their sense of smell to locate it. The training consists in getting them used to following the smell of drugs and finding them in exchange for a harmless prize, such as food, cuddles or attention.

Chronic drinkers.

Ptilocercus lowii

Drunk and annoying.

Sclerocarya birrea

buganu