Anonim

They are cheaper than a troupe of operators, they don't suffer from the cold, they don't need to eat or rest and, above all, they keep a constant eye on the most hidden and wild animal life.

Let's talk about hidden cameras in the midst of nature, which multiply our gazes on the most endangered specimens by improving the protection of biodiversity. Since 2010 a competition organized by the BBC Wildlife Magazine (go to the website www.discoverwildlife.com) rewards the best shots taken by camera traps. A way to share the scientific results discovered and the beauty of wild animal life.

The winning photos are published in the December issue of BBC Wildlife Magazine, now on sale. Click on the image to enlarge it.

The winning photo depicts a young Chinese leopard (Panthera pardus japonensis). Zhou Zhefeng, who photographed it as part of a project for the Shanxi Wocheng Institute of Ecology and Environment, received a prize of 3 thousand pounds (about 3700 euros).

The ears of a hare peep into the lens of a camera in Portugal. In the background, a storm.

At the hidden camera the thankless task of receiving the spit of this juggling bear (Melursus ursinus). We are in India for a WWF project.

A front row seat to watch the wrestling match between two argan varans (Varanus panoptes) or yellow spots.

A female of opossum from Virginia (Didelphis virginiana) carries the baby on its back during a night raid.

A giant pangolin (Manis gigantea) better known as a scaly anteater, scrutinizes intrigued before it.

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Let's talk about hidden cameras in the midst of nature, which multiply our gazes on the most endangered specimens by improving the protection of biodiversity. Since 2010 a competition organized by the BBC Wildlife Magazine (go to the website www.discoverwildlife.com) rewards the best shots taken by camera traps. A way to share the scientific results discovered and the beauty of wild animal life.
The winning photos are published in the December issue of BBC Wildlife Magazine, now on sale. Click on the image to enlarge it.