7 big companies born to do something else and then ...

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Samsung: 1938, dried fish. In March 1938 Lee Byung-chull, with a capital of just $ 27, opened a grocery store and a small company in Taegu, Korea. The company was called Samsung, and focused on importing and exporting dried fish, vegetables and noodles, which were later joined by sugar refining, insurance and textiles. The electronics? It arrived only in 1960 and the first TVs in 1969. Today, Samsung is a conglomerate of 80 companies that deal with electronics, telecommunications, construction, medicine and finance. In 1938 who would have imagined it?

Nokia: 1865, toilet paper. Nokia's history began in 1865, when engineer Fredrik Idestam opened a paper mill in Tammerkoski Rapids, Finland (the first logo in the photo). Six years later, Idestam opened another on the banks of the Nokianvirta River, which inspired him to call his company Nokia Ab. With time, Nokia entered the production of different goods, from gas masks to electricity and after a series of ownership changes in 1967 it took the name of Nokia Corporation, specializing in the production of toilet paper, car tires, rubber shoes, bicycles and computers. The mobile telephony business only began in 1979, when the Finnish company started a partnership with Salora for the Mobira Senator, the first car phone weighing 10 kg. Read the history of Nokia

3M: 1902, mines. In 1902, five businessmen from Minnesota (USA) founded 3M, which stands for Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company. At the beginning the company dealt with mines and mining, but it did not go well and after a failure here is the idea of ​​turning: dedicating oneself to the production of useful and innovative things: from waterproof sand paper to Scotch, created by the researcher Richard Drew in 1925. And it was this brilliant idea that made it possible for employees to dedicate one day a week to developing their creative projects. Result: today 3M trades 60, 000 different products used in homes, businesses, schools, hospitals, starting with the famous … Post-it notes, which date back to the late 60s.

Peugeot: 1810, blades and millstones. In 1810, brothers Jean-Pierre and Jean-Federic Peugeot converted their flour mill into a factory to produce blades and millstones. Later he was reminded of the idea of ​​dedicating himself to the production of crinolines (dresses held together by steel looms) and then of umbrella frames, wheels, bicycles and other metal accessories. The starting point for the logo - a lion with open jaws - which symbolize the strength of grinders comes precisely from this skill in handling metals. In 1882 Peugeot produced its first bicycle. And the car? He arrived only in 1890, preceded by a motor tricycle, unveiled at the Exposition Universelle in Paris in 1889, the same one in which the world saw the Eiffel Tower for the first time.

Hasbro: 1923, fabrics. One of the largest toy manufacturers in the world was founded by the Hassenfled brothers in 1923: at the beginning the company was called Hassenfeld Brothers Incorporated and was responsible for selling inventories of fabrics. Later came the production of pencils and pencil holders, and then toys and kits for doctors and nurses until 1952 when Hasbro bought Mr Potato Head's patent and officially entered the production of toys with wide circulation. The idea will bear its best fruits at the beginning of the 60s with the arrival of GI Joe, the first doll (or doll) designed for boys and, later, with the purchase of Parker Brothers, producer of the Monopoly.

Shell: 1833, shells. The shell-shaped sign you see on fuel distributors dates back to 1833, when a London shopkeeper, Marcus Samuel, began importing shells from the Far East as furniture items. In 1886, the business passed to his sons, Sam and Marcus Samuel Jr, who first devoted themselves to the import / export of rice, silk, copper and porcelain and then developed a strong interest in the oil trade, becoming the first to carry "Black gold" in oil tankers. The only thing that hasn't changed since then is the shell, which evidently brought him luck.

Wrigley: 1891, soap. In 1891 in Chicago, Wrigley was famous for soap. And to promote sales, William Wrigley Jr, thought of giving customers yeast powder packs. And when the yeast began to be more successful than soap, Wrigley decided to move on to the yeast business he … added as a gift two packets of chewing gum. The discovery that once again the tribute was more successful than the product it was supposed to promote, it was not long in coming …

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