What are liberalisations and how would they help to get out of the economic crisis?

Anonim
Special Crisis

The guide to understand the economic crisis with causes (and remedies), advice and questions and answers.

Liberalizations are measures that allow us to get rid of "hidden taxes" that we may not pay without damaging the country. These "taxes" are made by the privileges that each category, every corporation (from lawyers, pharmacists, teachers, notaries, taxi drivers etc.) has obtained for itself, with regulations and restrictions, to the disadvantage of all other citizens.

For Marcello Messori, professor of Economics at the University of Tor Vergata in Rome "the only necessary regulation is instead that which must guarantee consumers quality and efficiency. All that is extra can be eliminated and in Italy, of things to be eliminated, there would indeed be many. I wonder: what are the closed numbers for? What is the social and economic importance of 80% of notary services? Of course, all orders from day to night cannot be eliminated: that of doctors, which should also be reformed, is essential. But for many others, overcoming it seems to me the most natural way. Without thereby reaching a wild liberalization, which would be an even worse evil ».

Without realizing it, we pay other taxes. Not to the State but to the so-called "corporations" that is the trade associations (and not only) that impose restrictions of any kind.

"Generally, " explains Michele Pellizzari, professor of labor economics at Bocconi University in Milan, "they are defined by professional associations and arise from the need to give consumers the possibility of finding a qualified professional". But they almost always end up having other goals: for example avoiding competition (by imposing a limited number or other expedients) or keeping the price of their work higher (for example with minimum tariffs).

Three cases

Pros and cons of the liberalization of three professions: notary, taxi driver and pharmacist.

Read the cards

Notaries and taxi drivers
Corporations for example are notaries, merchants who set equal times for everyone (so as not to have competition from those who are willing to keep open longer), but taxi drivers' licenses, minimum fees for lawyers and architects are also corporate privileges, the rights of pharmacists (such as the right of a dead pharmacist's embryo to inherit his father's license), senior bureaucrats, politicians and so on. These are cases in which the defense of the interests of a single category or a single group (such as the citizens who want to put their landfill on the territory of others) penalizes all other consumers.
Earnings for everyone
Of course: cutting the privileges of each of these categories could reduce the gains, and for this reason every liberalization always provokes furious reactions. But if all the privileges of all the categories were cut, each of us, of any corporation, might gain a little less (in reality it seems that just the opposite would happen) but would pay at the same time much less all the products and services of other corporations.
If, for example, a notary or a pharmacist ended up earning less because of liberalization, he could at the same time pay less for drugs (notaries), sales deeds (pharmacists), taxis, architects, all other services and products. In the end, we would all have advantages …

The corporations and the lobbies, explains Francesco Giavazzi who teaches Political Economy at Bocconi University and is the author of the book Lobby of Italy, are very powerful: "If on the one hand it takes time for consumers to learn to appreciate the benefits of liberalization, on the other hand the lobbies are rapidly mobilized to influence the citizens. And they are often "infiltrated" in all parties ".

The corporations are in fact also reservoirs of votes for the parties, which reciprocate protecting them. For example, breeders traditionally support the League, which in exchange has obtained to pay the State the fines for their overruns on the "milk quotas" set by Europe, the teachers the left, the taxi drivers the right and so on.

So often the parties, instead of defending everyone's interests, end up defending only those of the corporations (or lobbies) linked to them.

The real, profound problem of Italy, according to an editorial by Ernesto Galli della Loggia in the Corriere della Sera, is «in the existence of a huge conservative social bloc whose objective is survival and immobility. Nothing has to change. This is the boulder that crushes and obscures our future. The Italian conservative-immobilist block is a very variegated aggregate. It is made up of vast and ferociously organized professional classes around their respective orders, unionized state officials, senior politicians, tax evaders, pensioners in their prime, fake invalids, employees of an untouchable court order, limited number taxi drivers, quota pharmacists, public concessionaires at preferential rates, around a million precarious workers, employees and administrators of local authority spas, unregistered entrepreneurs, tax-privileged co-operators, party buffs national, the nostalgic of collective bargaining always and in any case, the ranks of tax evaders, the entrepreneurs in the black, the aspirants to ope legis and amnesties, those who do not want that in their territory there is a landfill, a Tav line, a thermal plant, nuclear or whatever. And so on for countless other social segments, for a thousand other sectors and areas of the country. In total, an impressive mass of electorates.

An electorate now drugged, accustomed to drawing life, or hoping for his own future, from the small or great privilege, from the exception, from his own particular, particular condition of favor. "

Special Crisis

The guide to understand the economic crisis with causes (and remedies), advice and questions and answers.

Liberalizations are measures that allow us to get rid of "hidden taxes" that we may not pay without damaging the country. These "taxes" are made by the privileges that each category, every corporation (from lawyers, pharmacists, teachers, notaries, taxi drivers etc.) has obtained for itself, with regulations and restrictions, to the disadvantage of all other citizens.

For Marcello Messori, professor of Economics at the University of Tor Vergata in Rome "the only necessary regulation is instead that which must guarantee consumers quality and efficiency. All that is extra can be eliminated and in Italy, of things to be eliminated, there would indeed be many. I wonder: what are the closed numbers for? What is the social and economic importance of 80% of notary services? Of course, all orders from day to night cannot be eliminated: that of doctors, which should also be reformed, is essential. But for many others, overcoming it seems to me the most natural way. Without thereby reaching a wild liberalization, which would be an even worse evil ».

Without realizing it, we pay other taxes. Not to the State but to the so-called "corporations" that is the trade associations (and not only) that impose restrictions of any kind.

"Generally, " explains Michele Pellizzari, professor of labor economics at Bocconi University in Milan, "they are defined by professional associations and arise from the need to give consumers the possibility of finding a qualified professional". But they almost always end up having other goals: for example avoiding competition (by imposing a limited number or other expedients) or keeping the price of their work higher (for example with minimum tariffs).

Three cases

Pros and cons of the liberalization of three professions: notary, taxi driver and pharmacist.

Read the cards

Notaries and taxi drivers
Corporations for example are notaries, merchants who set equal times for everyone (so as not to have competition from those who are willing to keep open longer), but taxi drivers' licenses, minimum fees for lawyers and architects are also corporate privileges, the rights of pharmacists (such as the right of a dead pharmacist's embryo to inherit his father's license), senior bureaucrats, politicians and so on. These are cases in which the defense of the interests of a single category or a single group (such as the citizens who want to put their landfill on the territory of others) penalizes all other consumers.
Earnings for everyone
Of course: cutting the privileges of each of these categories could reduce the gains, and for this reason every liberalization always provokes furious reactions. But if all the privileges of all the categories were cut, each of us, of any corporation, might gain a little less (in reality it seems that just the opposite would happen) but would pay at the same time much less all the products and services of other corporations.
If, for example, a notary or a pharmacist ended up earning less because of liberalization, he could at the same time pay less for drugs (notaries), sales deeds (pharmacists), taxis, architects, all other services and products. In the end, we would all have advantages …

The corporations and the lobbies, explains Francesco Giavazzi who teaches Political Economy at Bocconi University and is the author of the book Lobby of Italy, are very powerful: "If on the one hand it takes time for consumers to learn to appreciate the benefits of liberalization, on the other hand the lobbies are rapidly mobilized to influence the citizens. And they are often "infiltrated" in all parties ".

The corporations are in fact also reservoirs of votes for the parties, which reciprocate protecting them. For example, breeders traditionally support the League, which in exchange has obtained to pay the State the fines for their overruns on the "milk quotas" set by Europe, the teachers the left, the taxi drivers the right and so on.

So often the parties, instead of defending everyone's interests, end up defending only those of the corporations (or lobbies) linked to them.

The real, profound problem of Italy, according to an editorial by Ernesto Galli della Loggia in the Corriere della Sera, is «in the existence of a huge conservative social bloc whose objective is survival and immobility. Nothing has to change. This is the boulder that crushes and obscures our future. The Italian conservative-immobilist block is a very variegated aggregate. It is made up of vast and ferociously organized professional classes around their respective orders, unionized state officials, senior politicians, tax evaders, pensioners in their prime, fake invalids, employees of an untouchable court order, limited number taxi drivers, quota pharmacists, public concessionaires at preferential rates, around a million precarious workers, employees and administrators of local authority spas, unregistered entrepreneurs, tax-privileged co-operators, party buffs national, the nostalgic of collective bargaining always and in any case, the ranks of tax evaders, the entrepreneurs in the black, the aspirants to ope legis and amnesties, those who do not want that in their territory there is a landfill, a Tav line, a thermal plant, nuclear or whatever. And so on for countless other social segments, for a thousand other sectors and areas of the country. In total, an impressive mass of electorates.

An electorate now drugged, accustomed to drawing life, or hoping for his own future, from the small or great privilege, from the exception, from his own particular, particular condition of favor. "

Special Crisis

The guide to understand the economic crisis with causes (and remedies), advice and questions and answers.

Liberalizations are measures that allow us to get rid of "hidden taxes" that we may not pay without damaging the country. These "taxes" are made by the privileges that each category, every corporation (from lawyers, pharmacists, teachers, notaries, taxi drivers etc.) has obtained for itself, with regulations and restrictions, to the disadvantage of all other citizens.

For Marcello Messori, professor of Economics at the University of Tor Vergata in Rome "the only necessary regulation is instead that which must guarantee consumers quality and efficiency. All that is extra can be eliminated and in Italy, of things to be eliminated, there would indeed be many. I wonder: what are the closed numbers for? What is the social and economic importance of 80% of notary services? Of course, all orders from day to night cannot be eliminated: that of doctors, which should also be reformed, is essential. But for many others, overcoming it seems to me the most natural way. Without thereby reaching a wild liberalization, which would be an even worse evil ».

Without realizing it, we pay other taxes. Not to the State but to the so-called "corporations" that is the trade associations (and not only) that impose restrictions of any kind.

"Generally, " explains Michele Pellizzari, professor of labor economics at Bocconi University in Milan, "they are defined by professional associations and arise from the need to give consumers the possibility of finding a qualified professional". But they almost always end up having other goals: for example avoiding competition (by imposing a limited number or other expedients) or keeping the price of their work higher (for example with minimum tariffs).

Three cases

Pros and cons of the liberalization of three professions: notary, taxi driver and pharmacist.

Read the cards

Notaries and taxi drivers
Corporations for example are notaries, merchants who set equal times for everyone (so as not to have competition from those who are willing to keep open longer), but taxi drivers' licenses, minimum fees for lawyers and architects are also corporate privileges, the rights of pharmacists (such as the right of a dead pharmacist's embryo to inherit his father's license), senior bureaucrats, politicians and so on. These are cases in which the defense of the interests of a single category or a single group (such as the citizens who want to put their landfill on the territory of others) penalizes all other consumers.
Earnings for everyone
Of course: cutting the privileges of each of these categories could reduce the gains, and for this reason every liberalization always provokes furious reactions. But if all the privileges of all the categories were cut, each of us, of any corporation, might gain a little less (in reality it seems that just the opposite would happen) but would pay at the same time much less all the products and services of other corporations.
If, for example, a notary or a pharmacist ended up earning less because of liberalization, he could at the same time pay less for drugs (notaries), sales deeds (pharmacists), taxis, architects, all other services and products. In the end, we would all have advantages …

The corporations and the lobbies, explains Francesco Giavazzi who teaches Political Economy at Bocconi University and is the author of the book Lobby of Italy, are very powerful: "If on the one hand it takes time for consumers to learn to appreciate the benefits of liberalization, on the other hand the lobbies are rapidly mobilized to influence the citizens. And they are often "infiltrated" in all parties ".

The corporations are in fact also reservoirs of votes for the parties, which reciprocate protecting them. For example, breeders traditionally support the League, which in exchange has obtained to pay the State the fines for their overruns on the "milk quotas" set by Europe, the teachers the left, the taxi drivers the right and so on.

So often the parties, instead of defending everyone's interests, end up defending only those of the corporations (or lobbies) linked to them.

The real, profound problem of Italy, according to an editorial by Ernesto Galli della Loggia in the Corriere della Sera, is «in the existence of a huge conservative social bloc whose objective is survival and immobility. Nothing has to change. This is the boulder that crushes and obscures our future. The Italian conservative-immobilist block is a very variegated aggregate. It is made up of vast and ferociously organized professional classes around their respective orders, unionized state officials, senior politicians, tax evaders, pensioners in their prime, fake invalids, employees of an untouchable court order, limited number taxi drivers, quota pharmacists, public concessionaires at preferential rates, around a million precarious workers, employees and administrators of local authority spas, unregistered entrepreneurs, tax-privileged co-operators, party buffs national, the nostalgic of collective bargaining always and in any case, the ranks of tax evaders, the entrepreneurs in the black, the aspirants to ope legis and amnesties, those who do not want that in their territory there is a landfill, a Tav line, a thermal plant, nuclear or whatever. And so on for countless other social segments, for a thousand other sectors and areas of the country. In total, an impressive mass of electorates.

An electorate now drugged, accustomed to drawing life, or hoping for his own future, from the small or great privilege, from the exception, from his own particular, particular condition of favor. "

Special Crisis

The guide to understand the economic crisis with causes (and remedies), advice and questions and answers.

Liberalizations are measures that allow us to get rid of "hidden taxes" that we may not pay without damaging the country. These "taxes" are made by the privileges that each category, every corporation (from lawyers, pharmacists, teachers, notaries, taxi drivers etc.) has obtained for itself, with regulations and restrictions, to the disadvantage of all other citizens.

For Marcello Messori, professor of Economics at the University of Tor Vergata in Rome "the only necessary regulation is instead that which must guarantee consumers quality and efficiency. All that is extra can be eliminated and in Italy, of things to be eliminated, there would indeed be many. I wonder: what are the closed numbers for? What is the social and economic importance of 80% of notary services? Of course, all orders from day to night cannot be eliminated: that of doctors, which should also be reformed, is essential. But for many others, overcoming it seems to me the most natural way. Without thereby reaching a wild liberalization, which would be an even worse evil ».

Without realizing it, we pay other taxes. Not to the State but to the so-called "corporations" that is the trade associations (and not only) that impose restrictions of any kind.

"Generally, " explains Michele Pellizzari, professor of labor economics at Bocconi University in Milan, "they are defined by professional associations and arise from the need to give consumers the possibility of finding a qualified professional". But they almost always end up having other goals: for example avoiding competition (by imposing a limited number or other expedients) or keeping the price of their work higher (for example with minimum tariffs).

Three cases

Pros and cons of the liberalization of three professions: notary, taxi driver and pharmacist.

Read the cards

Notaries and taxi drivers
Corporations for example are notaries, merchants who set equal times for everyone (so as not to have competition from those who are willing to keep open longer), but taxi drivers' licenses, minimum fees for lawyers and architects are also corporate privileges, the rights of pharmacists (such as the right of a dead pharmacist's embryo to inherit his father's license), senior bureaucrats, politicians and so on. These are cases in which the defense of the interests of a single category or a single group (such as the citizens who want to put their landfill on the territory of others) penalizes all other consumers.
Earnings for everyone
Of course: cutting the privileges of each of these categories could reduce the gains, and for this reason every liberalization always provokes furious reactions. But if all the privileges of all the categories were cut, each of us, of any corporation, might gain a little less (in reality it seems that just the opposite would happen) but would pay at the same time much less all the products and services of other corporations.
If, for example, a notary or a pharmacist ended up earning less because of liberalization, he could at the same time pay less for drugs (notaries), sales deeds (pharmacists), taxis, architects, all other services and products. In the end, we would all have advantages …

The corporations and the lobbies, explains Francesco Giavazzi who teaches Political Economy at Bocconi University and is the author of the book Lobby of Italy, are very powerful: "If on the one hand it takes time for consumers to learn to appreciate the benefits of liberalization, on the other hand the lobbies are rapidly mobilized to influence the citizens. And they are often "infiltrated" in all parties ".

The corporations are in fact also reservoirs of votes for the parties, which reciprocate protecting them. For example, breeders traditionally support the League, which in exchange has obtained to pay the State the fines for their overruns on the "milk quotas" set by Europe, the teachers the left, the taxi drivers the right and so on.

So often the parties, instead of defending everyone's interests, end up defending only those of the corporations (or lobbies) linked to them.

The real, profound problem of Italy, according to an editorial by Ernesto Galli della Loggia in the Corriere della Sera, is «in the existence of a huge conservative social bloc whose objective is survival and immobility. Nothing has to change. This is the boulder that crushes and obscures our future. The Italian conservative-immobilist block is a very variegated aggregate. It is made up of vast and ferociously organized professional classes around their respective orders, unionized state officials, senior politicians, tax evaders, pensioners in their prime, fake invalids, employees of an untouchable court order, limited number taxi drivers, quota pharmacists, public concessionaires at preferential rates, around a million precarious workers, employees and administrators of local authority spas, unregistered entrepreneurs, tax-privileged co-operators, party buffs national, the nostalgic of collective bargaining always and in any case, the ranks of tax evaders, the entrepreneurs in the black, the aspirants to ope legis and amnesties, those who do not want that in their territory there is a landfill, a Tav line, a thermal plant, nuclear or whatever. And so on for countless other social segments, for a thousand other sectors and areas of the country. In total, an impressive mass of electorates.

An electorate now drugged, accustomed to drawing life, or hoping for his own future, from the small or great privilege, from the exception, from his own particular, particular condition of favor. "