Anonim

Yes, unless the content of the sentences does not constitute some crime (for example racism, apology of fascism etc.). But be careful to take them to the bank: the "written" notes are considered damaged. The bank could hold them without replacing others. This rule was established by the European Central Bank Decision 2003/4 of March 20, 2003 which states: "(…) In cases where the banks have the certainty or sufficient reason to believe that the euro banknotes have been intentionally mutilated or damaged (…) refuse to consider them good and do not replace them; instead they keep them to avoid their return to circulation or the applicant presents them for replacement to another bank ”.

A new one for an old woman. The banks are willing to replace the banknotes if they believe that those who request the change are in good faith and if the damage is modest: for example, if there are only small entries, signatures, numbers or short sentences.
Among the most frequent "decorations" on banknotes there are colored mustaches and beards on the faces of the characters portrayed, insults to the banking system and the telephone number of the ex-girlfriend (which is obviously illegal). In Alaska there is a room, the Salty Dawg Saloon, completely covered with banknotes: all signed by customers.

Yes, unless the content of the sentences does not constitute some crime (for example racism, apology of fascism etc.). But be careful to take them to the bank: the "written" notes are considered damaged. The bank could hold them without replacing others. This rule was established by the European Central Bank Decision 2003/4 of March 20, 2003 which states: "(…) In cases where the banks have the certainty or sufficient reason to believe that the euro banknotes have been intentionally mutilated or damaged (…) refuse to consider them good and do not replace them; instead they keep them to avoid their return to circulation or the applicant presents them for replacement to another bank ”.

A new one for an old woman. The banks are willing to replace the banknotes if they believe that those who request the change are in good faith and if the damage is modest: for example, if there are only small entries, signatures, numbers or short sentences.
Among the most frequent "decorations" on banknotes there are colored mustaches and beards on the faces of the characters portrayed, insults to the banking system and the telephone number of the ex-girlfriend (which is obviously illegal). In Alaska there is a room, the Salty Dawg Saloon, completely covered with banknotes: all signed by customers.